Why Bother Nurturing The Ties That Bind?

Why Bother Nurturing Ties That Bind?

The day I held my first born son, I had no idea what the future held for him or for me. The role as a mother and a parent was and still is, at times, a mystery. But over the years, one thing has become clear and that is in order to maintain the tie that binds us, that tie must be nurtured.        

Oh The Things We  Do 

The umbilical cord, the life line that gave nutrients and oxygen to my babies in utero, was cut after each of their births. But despite that little procedure, there is still an invisible cord that connects me to them. No matter how old I get, I’m still their mom. And no matter how old they get, they will always be my sons. 

Like every fertilized egg, my children started out as little zygotes, and grew into full grown men. My husband and I desired our sons to grow into independent and responsible adults who could live independently. We carefully guarded and watched over them during their years as infants, then applauded their child like efforts as they learned to ride a bike, tie their shoes and add two plus two

During their adolescence we stood on the sidelines of soccer fields, basketball courts and swimming pools watching each compete in the sport of their choice. We taught them how to drive, cook, and launder their clothes. They learned how to earn and spend money by working odd jobs for neighbors during the summers and later part time jobs in the community.  Our audible sighs of relief came with each milestone they passed—high school and college graduations, marriage and finding their niche in the job market. 

Eating family meals together, going on vacations, and celebrating birthdays and holidays was just the norm. But that dailiness of doing regular life together day in and day out over the years is what strengthened our connectedness with one another. 

Now, with grown sons, it is not as easy nor is it the norm to come together for a meal, a holiday celebration or even just a summer’s hike. But that doesn’t mean it is not worth the effort required to cultivate what was once the norm.  

Why bother nurturing the tie that binds? It is worth it to nurture those ties that bind because a loose or broken cord holds nothing together.

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