Why Bother To Regard Our Limits?

Everything has its limits. Summer is never forever, but neither is winter. Each day has twenty-four hours and then it’s over. Even though we don’t see our expiration date, we all have one. 

Public meeting rooms such as arenas, theaters and symphony halls have their limits too. Only a designated number of people will fit within the confines of a given space. My car is limited. If I carry more than four people, including the driver, the struts will give out from too much weight. 

Regardless, limits are not meant for evil, but for our good. 

Moderation

How is it though, that we, as human beings, tend to exceed, ignore, or downright deny our personal limitations? Why do we think of ourselves as being unlimited?  

While our sons were teenagers, moderation was one of the key lessons my husband instilled in them. Whether they were driving, going out on a Friday night, or wrestling around with their brothers, he encouraged them to avoid extremes. He’d remind them that to exceed the speed limit equaled an expensive speeding ticket and a rise in insurance rates. To party too hardy could earn them a night in jail, and wrestling too intensely usually ended badly for one of them. If they paid attention to these limits, it would keep them from facing those inevitable consequences. 

To live within our personal borders is simple, but not always easy. Though our boss will applaud us if we agree to work longer hours for the company, our time with our family is thwarted. Knowing which is more important, lauds from our employer or personal time with those we love, will determine how easy it is for us to put margins around our time spent at work.

Though we live in a very busy and information filled world, we don’t have to ingest all the busyness or information of the world. We still have the freedom to pick and choose what we consume. Though I can’t join in on those conversations that people have about the latest posts on social media, the newest season of shows or popular movie personalities, I consider it an inconsequential consequence. I’d rather spend my time doing other things than keeping up with the latest trivia. 

Why bother to regard our limits? Though we have an unlimited buffet of choices to choose from each day of our lives, not all the choices are good for us. Regarding our personal limits will free us up to enjoy those things that benefit us the most.